abused
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A child who recants (takes back) a disclosure of abuse was probably not abused. This is the conclusion of many experts in the field, and it’s backed up by research. It’s also supported by common sense: why would anyone admit to something they didn’t do? In this article, we will examine some key findings about false allegations and what you can do to help ensure your clients’ rights are protected if they disclose abuse. False Allegations Are Rare Whether because children have been coached or pressured into making an untrue statement with their parents present at interviews; or because children know that adults automatically believe them when reporting sexual assault – approximately ten percent of all reports turn out to be fabricated for reasons such as attention-seeking, coercion from perpetrators or parental pressure. Whether because children have been coached or pressured into making an untrue statement with their parents present at interviews; or because children know that adults automatically believe them when reporting sexual assault – approximately ten percent of all reports turn out to be fabricated for reasons such as attention-seeking, coercion from perpetrators or parental pressure. It’s Difficult to Tell When a Report Is False Child welfare agencies and the courts are careful not to tell families who disclose abuse about false allegations so they will not retract any statements made during investigations. However, it is sometimes difficult to ascertain whether a report has been falsified: some experts say that in one quarter of cases where there were no signs of physical injury but child claims

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